Discussion – 

0

Discussion – 

0

Cambridge – Lightly Brushed Neutral Colors

A Timeless Palette

When it comes to choosing a new floor, it can be a daunting task to choose one that you’ll love for years to come. Choosing a neutral floor can give peace of mind that your floor won’t look out of date as your design changes in the future. The Cambridge Collection features 8 color tones that suit both modern and classic design – and any new style you choose!

Adelaide Terrace

Cambridge: Lightly Brushed Neutral Colors

  • Gentle wirebrushing brings the grain of the wood to life
  • Distinct knots and character marks are a trademark of European White Oak
  • Versatile color palette ranging from classic to contemporary tones

See Cambridge In Your Space

We’ve made it simple to choose the right floor for you. Click the link below to pick 3 free samples for you to look at in person.

Behind The Names

Cambridge, England, is famous unto itself with noteworthy neighbors as well. Names like Milton, Clare, and Chesterton date back hundreds of years, are their descendants are synonymous with classic English literature and history.

A couple you’ll recognize from this collection:

  • Newton – A nearby village and the surname of the great Sir Isaac Newton, who had maybe the most prolific inspiration from a tree as Voltaire described, “Sir Isaac Newton walking in his gardens, had the first thought of his system of gravitation, upon seeing an apple falling from a tree.”
  • Wolfson – College at Cambridge that derives its name from the family patriarch Solomon Wolfson, a Scottish immigrant in the 19th century. He was a furniture maker along with his son who later built a retail business that grew into a conglomerate of DIY home-improvement stores.
  • Chesterton – A suburb of Cambridge, but also the surname of the prolific 20th century author, G. K. Chesterton. Known for his nature analogies that help make sense of the complexities of the modern world, like his story, “The Wind and The Trees”. Chesterton recalls overhearing an exasperated 4-year-old boy caught in blustery conditions during a walk in Battersea Park. The torn sky and tossing trees pushed the lad to his limit and his fondly admired hat blew away. He said to his mother, “Well, why don’t you take away the trees, and then it wouldn’t wind.”
Tags:

Discussion – 

0

Discussion – 

0

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

You May Also Like

X